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Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes

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The term “archetype” means original pattern in ancient Greek. Jung used the concept of archetype in his theory of the human psyche. He identified 12 universal, mythic characters archetypes reside within our collective unconscious.

Jung defined twelve primary types that represent the range of basic human motivations.  Each of us tends to have one dominant archetype that dominates our personality.

The 12 Jungian Archetypes

  1. Ruler
  2. Creator/Artist
  3. Sage
  4. Innocent
  5. Explorer
  6. Rebel
  7. Hero
  8. Wizard
  9. Jester
  10. Everyman
  11. Lover
  12. Caregiver

What do each of the 12 archetypes seek?

The 4 Cardinal Orientations

The 4 cardinal orientations that the archetypes are seeking to realise are:

  1. Ego – Leave a Mark on the World
  2. Order – Provide Structure to the World
  3. Social – Connect to others
  4. Freedom – Yearn for Paradise

The 12 Archetypes in Detail

Detailed Description of Desires, Fears and Talents of each of the 12 Archetypes

The Ego Types

1. The Innocent

  • Motto: Free to be you and me
  • Core desire: to get to paradise
  • Goal: to be happy
  • Greatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrong
  • Strategy: to do things right
  • Weakness: boring for all their naive innocence
  • Talent: faith and optimism
  • The Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer.

2. The Everyman

  • Motto: All men and women are created equal
  • Core Desire: connecting with others
  • Goal: to belong
  • Greatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowd
  • Strategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touch
  • Weakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationships
  • Talent: realism, empathy, lack of pretense
  • The Everyman is also known as: The good old boy, regular guy/girl, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbor, the silent majority.

3. The Hero

  • Motto: Where there’s a will, there’s a way
  • Core desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous acts
  • Goal: expert mastery in a way that improves the world
  • Greatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken”
  • Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possible
  • Weakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fight
  • Talent: competence and courage
  • The Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player.

4. The Caregiver

  • Motto: Love your neighbour as yourself
  • Core desire: to protect and care for others
  • Goal: to help others
  • Greatest fear: selfishness and ingratitude
  • Strategy: doing things for others
  • Weakness: martyrdom and being exploited
  • Talent: compassion, generosity
  • The Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter.

The Soul Types

5. The Explorer

  • Motto: Don’t fence me in
  • Core desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world
  • Goal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life
  • Biggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptiness
  • Strategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredom
  • Weakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfit
  • Talent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soul
  • The explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim.

6. The Rebel

  • Motto: Rules are made to be broken
  • Core desire: revenge or revolution
  • Goal: to overturn what isn’t working
  • Greatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectual
  • Strategy: disrupt, destroy, or shock
  • Weakness: crossing over to the dark side, crime
  • Talent: outrageousness, radical freedom
  • The Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast.

7. The Lover

  • Motto: You’re the only one
  • Core desire: intimacy and experience
  • Goal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they love
  • Greatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unloved
  • Strategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractive
  • Weakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identity
  • Talent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitment
  • The Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder.

8. The Creator/Artist

  • Motto: If you can imagine it, it can be done
  • Core desire: to create things of enduring value
  • Goal: to realize a vision
  • Greatest fear: mediocre vision or execution
  • Strategy: develop artistic control and skill
  • Task: to create culture, express own vision
  • Weakness: perfectionism, bad solutions
  • Talent: creativity and imagination
  • The Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer.

The Self Types

9. The Jester

  • Motto: You only live once
  • Core desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment
  • Goal: to have a great time and lighten up the world
  • Greatest fear: being bored or boring others
  • Strategy: play, make jokes, be funny
  • Weakness: frivolity, wasting time
  • Talent: joy
  • The Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian.

10. The Sage

  • Motto: The truth will set you free
  • Core desire: to find the truth.
  • Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world.
  • Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance.
  • Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes.
  • Weakness: can study details forever and never act.
  • Talent: wisdom, intelligence.
  • The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative.

11. The Magician

  • Motto: I make things happen.
  • Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universe
  • Goal: to make dreams come true
  • Greatest fear: unintended negative consequences
  • Strategy: develop a vision and live by it
  • Weakness: becoming manipulative
  • Talent: finding win-win solutions
  • The Magician is also known as:The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man.

12. The Ruler

  • Motto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.
  • Core desire: control
  • Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community
  • Strategy: exercise power
  • Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown
  • Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate
  • Talent: responsibility, leadership
  • The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.

A Corporate Perspective on Jungian Archetypes

Which well known corporate brands are representative of each of the archetypes?

If you liked this post, you will also like Why Business Leaders Hire Coaches and What is a Story?.

Further Personality Resources

Conor explaining the Big 5 Personality Traits…

Other Personality Profile tools to understand yourself and those around you:

What is your dominant archetype?  I’d love to hear in the comments below 😉

151 responses to “Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes”

  1. […] view of life (as do all archetypes in Jungian understanding) represented in the following mandala (https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/). It is also interesting that the Archetype of Safety is coupled with Innocence yet opposed to […]

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  8. […] alternative to do your self-assessment is also through the 12 Jungian Archetypes. The latter represents the basis of your motivation to do your job, which can strengthen your […]

  9. […] to make pivotal decisions in his life. This detachment of the Ego, and arrival into what Jungian psychology defines as the observing Ego, is practiced commonly in […]

  10. […] won’t go into each of the archetypes in detail because there are many resources you can read up on to learn […]

  11. What no negative archetypes, none exist? No lying, backstabbing, greedy, …. you know .. politicians, lawyers, middle managers, corporate executives, etc.

  12. […] the ‘Hero’ archetype, what images and stories immediately form into your head. The hero is also known as the warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, soldier, dragon slayer, winner, and […]

  13. […] If you want to drive further into these four dream team members, they were taken from Carl Jung’s 12 Archetypes. This article gives a good breakdown of all twelve of them. […]

  14. […] far as I know, there are around 12 different feminine archetypes. (You can check them out here) Even though there are 12 different archetypes, doesn’t mean that you will fit evenly in one […]

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  19. […] Neill C 21 April 2018 “Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes” […]

  20. […] Read more about the personalities and traits of Jungs 12 archetypes, here. […]

  21. […] using Carl Jung’s character archetypes to clarify this point in the […]

  22. […] არქეტიპის კონცეფცია თავის თეორიაში ანალიტიკური ფსიქოლოგიის ფუძემდებელმა კარლ გუსტავ იუნგმა გამოიყენა. ის მიიჩნევდა, რომ ყოველი ადამიანი, გარკვეულ არქეტიპს, ანუ „პირველ სახეს“ შეესაბამება. იუნგის მოსაზრებას მალევე მიმდევრები გამოუჩნდნენ და არქეტიპებმა სხვა სფეროებიც მოიცვა. ცნობილი ფსიქოლოგის ამ მოსაზრებას დღეს ბრენდინგშიც წამყვანი ადგილი უჭირავს.  […]

  23. […] (Howard-Spink and Levy, 2002, para.22) Image obtained from: https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  24. […] Understanding personality: The 12 Jungian archetypes. Moving People to Action. Available at:<https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/&gt; [Accessed November 14, […]

  25. […] Image obtained from: https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  26. […] 12 character archetypes […]

  27. […] back in the years, the past generations could fit more easily into one of Carl Jung’s 12 archetypes, now it’s not the case […]

  28. […] Jung elaborou, há o rebelde, criador, herói, cuidador, inocente, entre outros. Ràckél conta que, na visão […]

  29. […] Neill gives a quick summary in his article, “Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes”, wherein he uses this […]

  30. […] The 12 Archetypes of Jung that, in my opinion, gives us more variety and depth. Carl Jung defined 12 archetypes that can well be used to carry out the process of building the brand personality of your company. The 12 Jungian archetypes are: […]

  31. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  32. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  33. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  34. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  35. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  36. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  37. […] our personality through archetypes and personas. Brand archetypes are modeled after the 12 primary character archetypes theorized by the famous Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Jung. They represent fundamental and recurring human themes and motivations that are easy to recognize […]

  38. […] Image obtained from: https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  39. […] Image obtained from: https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  40. […] Obtained from Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  41. […] based on Carl Jung’s theory that people tend to use symbolism to understand concepts. He defined 12 archetypes that represent different groupings of characteristics, aspirations, values and […]

  42. […] by using Jungian archetypal symbols to communicate a message and influence emotion. Examples of Jungian archetypes used as brand identity in advertising […]

  43. […] condition in our childhood will have likely established a feedback loop of emotional warping toward that archetype. In other words, we will feel a guttural reaction toward them rather than establishing […]

  44. […] hazardous environments for characters to explore, provides Antagonist Profiles based on the 12 Jungian Archetypes. During the creation of these profiles, I stumbled across a few tools that helped me come up with […]

  45. […] a complicated framework onto a complex problem. You may be familiar with Carl Jung, and his “12 Archetypes” of “Ruler, Sage, Explorer, etc”, which are frequently criticised as mystical or […]

  46. Very good article . . . Can anyone please tell me how you define which Archetype you are? Is it through various questionnaires only or is there an alternative way? Many thanks in advance. 😊🥰

  47. […] Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes – Conor Neil […]

  48. There is more than 12 archetypes. The limitation of 12 is too simplistic and confuses the terrain. The Hero is not also the warrior for example. Also, the Jester and Magician are two facets of the same underlying archetype (Hermes is Greek myth). The explorer/seeker evolves into the teacher. The hero archetype begins as the divine child, and becomes the true king, which is different again from the Ruler. Maiden, Mother Crone is another evolutionary path of the one underlying archetype.
    Archetypes such as the destroyer/death, the troublemaker, the priestess/medium are a few of the additional archetypes.

  49. […] it in this sense, you begin to see universal patterns and similarities. Carl Jung dubbed these as Archetypes. There are 4 major archetypes that form human […]

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  52. […] Jung has his archetypes, Erik Erikson, with his development stages, Karen Horney, for her neurotic needs. These […]

  53. […] from the above 2 more popular ones, there are also the Jungian archetypes, Enneagram personalities, and DISC personalities, among many others. Pick any 1 that you’re more […]

  54. […] People to Action (21 April 2018) Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes, conorneill, accessed 19 March […]

  55. […] let’s talk about it! via & via […]

  56. […] arhetipuri sunt Inocentul, Înțeleptul, Exploratorul, „Haiducul”/Proscrisul, Magicianul, Eroul, […]

  57. Hi, I’m a Jungian certified depth-psychotherapist of long standing. My book, “The Dream Belongs to the Dreamer” earns consistent five stars on Amazon. For the last year I’ve been Zooming all things Jung with the goal of bringing more insight into the mainstream. People are challenged by Jungian terms such as archetypes and the collective unconscious. Jung’s definitions can be quite challenging. I plan to pass this information along to my students as a learning aid. It’s not Jung but it sure is close enough to count. Thank you Conor!

  58. […] Neill, C. (2020, December 26). Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes. Moving People to Action. https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  59. […] I was interested in Jung’s theories regarding dreams/fantasies and stories helping us to express ideas, the primitive mentality of our ancestors, and from that the archetypes. These stuck with me a lot during my research, I had heard of them before, particularly linked to writing, and I was intrigued to find the brand archetypes which designers and marketers use for advertising as well. I find myself falling into some of these categories, and relating to adverts which use them – when I became a mum, I naturally gravitated towards any advert which featured a ‘good’ parent, I am drawn to adverts that convey the users of their products as Artists, I’ll buy the brand that makes me feel like an outlaw, or an explorer, or a hero. I’m no more immune to it than the next person…! I read through some of the detailed descriptions of the archetypes, and felt myself relating to many of them.https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  60. […] devenit parte a inconștientului nostru colectiv. La un anumit nivel primar, am interiorizat anumite arhetipuri și povești și le-am făcut parte din viziunea noastră comună asupra […]

  61. […] Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  62. […] Furthermore, he also divided the 12 into four more groups of three, which Jung described as cardinal directions. The cardinal directions define what the archetypes are seeking to realize. This is shown in the diagram below, taken from an excellent article looking at the 12 major archetypes on conorneill.com […]

  63. […] Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  64. […] The Collected Works of Carl Jung ★ Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes ★ “Beyond Good and Evil” by Friedrich Nietzsche (free ebook)★ “Thus Spoke […]

  65. […] Esta lista de arquetipos se conoce como los 12 arquetipos de Jung. […]

  66. […] Neill gives a quick summary in his article, “Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes”, wherein he uses this […]

  67. Enneagram is spelled with two (2) Ns.

  68. […] Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes. [online] Moving People to Action. Available at: https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ [Accessed 10 November […]

  69. […] Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  70. […] big 4 – Self, Persona, Shadow and Anima/mus) but here’s something useful.According to this website, Jung identified 12 archetypes (one of which they say tends to dominate our personalities, but […]

  71. […] & film, as an inner figure swinging between protecting & persecuting us…. (⬆️ CHART […]

  72. […] The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  73. Many of these comments observe how the archetypes fit their own beings within their existence but they archetypes also exist to explain other people, events, and places.

  74. […] fantastic, as Peterson explores the writings of Nietzsche and Dostoyevsky, the archetypes of Jung, the idea of subjugation with regards to the individual and society, the series of patterns […]

  75. […] Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  76. […] Jung’s work on archetypes may be helpful here. They are a way to explore character and actions and may help you expand the options for you to consider. See, for example, https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ […]

  77. […] who have influenced me, Eric Morris, for making me aware of sub-personalities. Many of my ideas on Archetypes come from Carl Jung and Joseph Campbell  as well as several years of training based on Hal and […]

  78. The 12 archetypes are popularly attributed to Jung, but never with citations. That’s because while archetypes are a concept developed by Jung, the 12 specific archetypes are not. Jung’s name is tacked onto them to lend his authority to the idea of these 12, rather arbitrary characterisations.

    ‘K, thx, bye.

  79. […] Relatable: Help your audience connect to your story. Use universal archetypes such as the innocent, the caregiver, or the child that everyone can relate […]

  80. […] healing and self-development. Today’s psychoanalysts also allude to this fact by classifying 12 “personality types” which they attribute to the 12 major […]

  81. […] Carl Jung, the psychologist, realized why that was the case. There are certain behavioral patterns that can be used to describe motivations for performing certain actions. […]

  82. I don’t think Carl Jung wrote this. I literally can’t find it in ANY of his books. Can you please share your sources?

    1. Joseph Campbell popularized Jungian archetypes. You have all of Jung’s books? Because they’re are quite pricy and his family kept them unpublished for decades. You’ve read and understood The Red Book? That’s the one his family kept out of sight for so long. And it’s precisely because people do not understand it. James Hillman was a Jungian scholar and often referred to as an interpreter of Jung’s works. Also Jung wrote prolifically. And yes he conceived of the archetypes. His versions are highly esoteric though.

  83. […] readers may already be familiar with the 12 Jungian archetypes, the framework developed by psychologist Carl Jung for understanding human personality. Each […]

  84. […] Contoh Jungian Archetypes pada beberapa brand ternama […]

  85. […] Read more about the personalities and traits of Jungs 12 archetypes, here. […]

  86. […] see this more clearly in the theory of psycho-analyst, Carl G. Jung, in the 20th Century. Jung outlined 12 archetypes which he believed to be the key attributes to adopt to become complete. Jung was heavily influenced […]

  87. […] (To learn more about the core 12 Jungian Archetypes, upon which brand archetypes are based, you can also check out this article.) […]

  88. […] Uncategorized […]

  89. […] the term ‘shadow self’ or ‘ id’, also referred to as the shadow aspect or archetype. It is the aspect of an individual’s psyche that is unconscious. The ego may not recognize this […]

  90. […] view of life (as do all archetypes in Jungian understanding) represented in the following mandala (https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/). It is also interesting that the Archetype of Safety is coupled with Innocence yet opposed to […]

  91. […] Reference this image found on this website. […]

  92. […] You can find a deeper dive into the archetypes in general all over the web, including Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes. […]

  93. Trying to analyse my Sagitarian self also my Aquarian wife, to see how these are described in the Jung analyses.
    Sagitarian (in my case) fits HERO and CREATOR, also SAGE, EXPLORER, LOVER and RULER!
    Aquarian wife is INNOCENT and CAREGIVER.
    The Jung analysis is useful in terms of seeing goals and weaknesses, but the zodiacs are amazingly perceptive, about 95% in every case that I’ve analysed (about 9 people).

    1. Consider the Enneagram. 🙂

  94. […] Jung. From his understanding of the subconscious, he was able to divide human personalities into 12 archetypes. The Sage Archetype is one of […]

  95. […] themes and characters that existed independently of the different cultures. He called these archetypes.  Different “personas” one can attribute themselves […]

  96. […] Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes […]

  97. […] identified 12 ‘archetypes’ that represent our unconscious motivations. Unfortunately not all of Eggers’ examples fit neatly, […]

  98. What are the references for this article? I would like to read additional information on the cardinal orientations.

  99. Love the profound truths in this article. Very important to know your strengths and weaknesses to be the best version of self and not get in the way in the process. We all have natural ability, it’s important to work in your strengths and improve weaknesses. I recently found mine through a NES health assessment which are amazing! (I can do yours just contact me) As the magician type, in business it’s called tactician, the CEO type. Ironically, that is been my career for 35+ years. The infographics are on point. Thank you for doing your homework.

  100. Hi ! Could someone enlighten me on the difference between the Ego, Soul and Self type differences ? Why are the archetypes grouped the way they are ?
    Also, does anyone have literrature on the journey of the “Self type” and “Soul type” ? Although the Hero type (Ego) has been well documented, I can’t find much on the two last.
    Thanks

    1. In Jung’s Collected Work 9 II, Aion starts with The Ego, The Shadow, The Syzygy: Anima and Animus, The Self in the four first chapters. The Self is the total of any person. The ego you can see as a smaller circle within The Self – the outer circumference of the individual. The lower half of this circle of The Self is where you will find The Shadow, Anima/Animus. Others can clearly see aspects of the Shadow, but The Ego is unconscious of what is in The Shadow. The journey of maturing is about integrating the shadow – a tramscemdomg function making the unconscious conscious- as a part of The Ego. Everyone is the “Self type”, The soul is not a type, so to speak, you find it in any Self.

  101. Love this article and the images that correspond. I have a question for you! Can one evolve through out these archetypes over time? I was looking to see where I might fit into these wheels and found myself reflecting back into college years in one segment and as I’ve grown older leaning heavily into another. Did Jung ever address the transformation of the archetypes in ones life?

    1. I don’t know about Jung, but my own personal experience. I first did the Myers Briggs type indicator when I was 14. My father had done it at work and brought it home to see what each of us kids were. I came out as INTP. When I do the test nowadays, I come out as ENTP. I have definitely moved along the spectrum of one major personality aspect 😉

      1. What a cool dad 😀 Thank you for your reply! I kept marinading on this and wonder if we do experience different layers of these archetypes throughout phases of our life. Perhaps as we do experience them they always root back to the most influential whether we realize it or not. Food for thought at least. Thank you Conor!

        1. Yes, my dad was great at bringing great ideas home from his work and sharing them with us. I often share ideas of psychology with my daughters – and try to keep it practical 😉

    2. Yes! One of the books I read actually had a chart that showed the growth from one, by solving the problem of that one, and how one moves to the next, with the associated strengths and weaknesses. Sorry, do not remember title of book. Pretty sure it was one on enneagrams. Hope this helps and you can find the book/chart if interested. P.S. I am also way different now than I used to be, so I’ve definitely changed a lot over the years.

    3. These archetypes are not fixations, they can all be found in your psyche. Don’t think of it like personality types as ENTP INTP…etc. Don’t say it like, “I think I am/was a warrior at this point in life”…etc. There’s no evolving from one to other because they’re all in you, within your unconscious. No evolving; only noticing, knowing and then negotiating. They have their own autonomy in your unconscious. They make you do things by intruding into your conciousness, the ego-self. And that’s where you need to notice the archetype(or you can say the unconscious pattern). For example, you can find yourself acting like a clown making jokes in a social environment without even noticing. Usually, other people tell you that you acted this way, you can only notice it that way. Here, the jester in your unconscious intrudes into your conscious. It’s kind of a possession. You need to notice them directly or indirectly, then develop an understanding and construct a dialogue with them. You’re not them, they have their own autonomy and they’re lurking in your unconscious. It’s a bit scary to think of it like this maybe but that’s how it is, in Jungian way. So it’s not about finding which archetype you fit into. That’s not how archetypes work. In Jungian psychology, the ego which is the conscious self, make up a tiny part of the overall psyche, the self. Rest of the self is in unconscious, and these archetypes are part of the unconscious. Basically, Jungian psychology, is about opening up a dialogue between the ego (the conscious self) and the unconscious (where all these archetypes lurks) in order to achieve wholeness & unity of the self

    4. In Aion (Collected Work 9.2), Jung explains Christ as a symbol of The Self (An archetype), there he explains the individuation and transcending function of an archetype. I feel that the wheel is more astrological than Jungian. E.g.The Ruler, Power can be seen as the shadow side of a leader. From my understanding of Jung, these wheels do not feel Jungian to me. I see 7 Archetypes here. Psychological Types could also be included here, yet they are not.

    5. Check out The Enneagram.

  102. […] Carl Jung, the psychologist, realized why that was the case. There are certain behavioral patterns that can be used to describe motivations for performing certain actions. […]

  103. […] Heroes in myth are you – the reader. The Gods are attributes and aspects of your personality – or in other words, the subtle energies that manifest as strengths and weaknesses – the archetypes described by Carl Jung. […]

  104. Hmmmm this isnt concrete in my opinion. Human beings are more complex than this. I tend to agree with the archetype critics. Oversimplifies the human condition. We don’t practice the same medicine we did back in 1945 we don’t still believe in some of the science from 1936. We don’t even grow crops the same way we did in 1950. Why then are we practicing the same psychology? Jung died in 1961. Yes “some” of his work is still relevant today however the archetypes leave something to be desired in my humble opinion. Some of his work is to connected to a long gone culture.

  105. […] 12 Archetypes explained. Source: https://conorneill.com/2018/04/21/understanding-personality-the-12-jungian-archetypes/ What Jung thought each of the archetypes sought (what drove their motivation). Source: […]

  106. […] Your brand is the reflection of your business. Everything that’s inside of your company, including your processes, organisational culture and core values, will be translated into your products and services. You should know that there are some efficient branding frameworks out there you can use to build a powerful brand identity (e.g. Kapferer’s Prism or Jung’s archetypes). […]

  107. Hi! I’ve been searching in the web and I couln’t find the source book for this material. Do you know in which book did Jung specified this 12 archetypes? Thanks!

    1. @Nahuel I was looking for similar source documentation. The best result I found was here:” https://culturetalk.com/12-archetypes/ ” Apparently Dr. Carol S. Pearson built on Jung’s work and categorized the “12 Archetypes”.

    2. Jung has not specified these 12 archetypes. That is the work of Carol Pearson.

  108. […] at grouping us in the past. The Myers-Briggs system sorts people into 16 archetypes based on Carl Jung’s observations of acquaintances and literary references. The system is largely discredited these […]

  109. […] at grouping us in the past. The Myers-Briggs system sorts people into 16 archetypes based on Carl Jung’s observations of acquaintances and literary references. The system is largely discredited these […]

  110. Where can I learn more about these archetypes please? Any book you’d recommend?

    1. Daniel – for me the best source on applied archetypes is anything by Joseph Campbell. I prefer his audio recordings to his books. I’ll do a future blog post linking to as many good Joseph Campbell resources as I can find. Jung investigated these from dream imagery, so some of his writings are good to understand how he identified the common dream characters and put them into these categories.

  111. I see the links to DISC, Enneagram, MBTI etc. Have you ever done a direct comparison between Jung’s types and these tools? Would be interesting to read your thoughts on this.

  112. You can see from a persons preference for a certain brand, the archetype he associate himself the most with.

  113. […] Source: Understanding Personality: The 12 Jungian Archetypes – Moving People to Action […]

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