This video comes from IESE during the Executive MBA (EMBA) intensive week in Barcelona. Florian Mueck, John Zimmer, Tony Anagor and Tobias Rodrigues all share wisdom on:

  1. public speaking
  2. hand gestures
  3. giving constructive feedback and
  4. the powerful pause

The Guests on this Week’s Video:

You are going to give a TED talk? You want to give a TED talk? It is on your bucket list to deliver a TED talk?  This video is for you…

The 10 Areas to Prepare a TED Talk

ted

Learn about the 10 areas:

This is a 20 minute video covering 10 areas that you will need to work on in order to Prepare, Deliver and benefit from a TED Talk.

 

TED Talk Further Materials:

  • “How stupid are our leaders?”
  • “How stupid are they?”
  • “I’m really rich”
  • “Politicians are all talk, no action”
  • “huge,” “terrible,” “beautiful.”

Any guesses which political leader made these statements?

“he prefers simple language” Jon Favreau, Obama speechwriter

How Donald Trump Speaks

Donald Trump dominates a specific type of rhetoric. His speaking is radically different to every other political candidate in the USA.

21language_graphic_web-1547In the graphic to the left, researchers passed the speeches of all the US political candidates through the Flesch-Kincaid readability test, an analysis that tells us what level of school you need to understand the speaker.

Bernie Sanders speaks at a high school level.

Hilary speaks at junior high level.

Where’s Donald?

Donald Trump speaks at a 4th grade level.  He speaks directly and simply.

Read the full review of the Flesch-Kincaid analysis over at the Boston Globe: For presidential hopefuls, simpler language resonates: Trump tops GOP field while talking to voters at fourth-grade level

 

Speak in simple words

What does Donald do?  There are 3 key things:  Simplicity, Dialogue, Repetition

  1. His language is Simple – Short sentences.  “Look at Paris”.  75% of his words are single syllable words.
  2. He uses Dialogue – “lots of people” call me and tell me “thank you Donald, you said what needs to be said”  “They say Trump has a point”
  3. He uses Repetition – “Make America Great Again”, “Problem, problem, problem”.  The power of repetition is that we start to believe something is true if we hear it repeated enough time.

Focus on The Audience

What allows him to do this is that he is always speaking about the audience’s problems.  He never talks about how difficult it can be, he never goes into details about how…  he brings it back time and time again to “Problems, problems, problems.”

Donald Trump follows in a long line of US Presidents that radically altered the nature of effective political communication.  Abraham Lincoln made the radical communication step of using newspapers to share his message.  Dwight D Eisenhower made the radical communication step of using radio to speak directly to people in their homes, in his fireside chats.  JFK used television more powerfully than any other politician.

How Donald Trump Answers a Question

The Nerdwriter episode on “How Donald Trump Answers a Question” is a brilliant analysis of one specific answer that Trump gave to Jimmy Kimmel.  If you are reading this via email, check out the video here: How Donald Trump Answers A Question

How Simple can we Go?

“A leaders’ job isn’t to educate the public — it’s to inspire and persuade them, That requires meeting people where they are, and speaking in words that are easily accessible to the broadest possible audience. Perhaps the most powerful, inspirational political phrase of the last decade or so involved three of the simplest words in the English language: yes we can.’’Jon Favreau, Obama’s speechwriter

“At some point enough is enough, If you continue drawing these lines, you’re going to hit comic strip levels. . . . There are real costs to oversimplification.” Elvin T. Lim, professor at Wesleyan University

and… to finish…  why Donald tweets

If you are reading this via email, check out the video here: How and Why Donald Trump Tweets

 

 

 

Here’s June Cohen, Executive Producer at TED Media, sharing her answers to

  1. What makes a great TED Talk?
  2. What are the elements of a great TED Talk? and
  3. What makes a TED.com talk?

She passionately outlines her experience of what types of talks will “go viral”.

The Ingredients of a Great TED talk

In this 14 minute talk, she covers:

  • the importance of story in a TED talk
  • being personal without being confessional
  • how to start a TED talk (the online editors deliberately remove “hello”, “good morning”, and any silly joke at the start, anything that doesn’t grab us at the start)
  • how to focus (there is time for 1 single idea)
  • how to be relevant to a wide audience (giving relevant context)
  • Practice, practice, practice… and more practice (including the sad, sad story of “That was a really good talk, but it wasn’t the best talk that that speaker could give”)

Today I am sharing a post from John Zimmer...

There is a small group of blogs that I always read.  One is John Zimmer’s Manner of Speaking.  This week he shared a video he found of Kevin Spacey (the actor) talking to an audience of online marketers.

Kevin Spacey talks about 3 ingredients of compelling stories:

  1. Conflict – there must be obstacles in the path of the hero
  2. Authenticity – the story must feel real
  3. Audience – a speaker is not a speaker without an audience (just some crazy man shouting at a wall) – feed the hunger for wisdom, for real experience and for connection of an audience and you will have them.

Read more over at John’s blog:

Kevin Spacey’s Three Key Elements to a Compelling Story

Stories are important for almost any communication situation. Spacey’s advice to those in business or marketing?I think it starts with what story do you want to tell. And if you start with what story you want to tell, everything else will follow. … Begin very simply and then start to build the blocks toward telling that story. What’s the best and most efficient and most compelling way that I can tell that story?

via Kevin Spacey’s Three Key Elements to a Compelling Story.

This is a series of 10 interviews with the expert coaches during the IESE EMBA Intensive week 2013.  (If you are viewing via rss, video on the blog here).  The Expert Contributors are:

The Speaking Guru Interviews

Questions from You

What questions do you have for next year’s set of expert interviews?

How do you respond when a person says “Tell me about yourself?”

Photo Credit: just.Luc
“Tell me about yourself?”, Photo Credit: just.Luc

It might be called confidence, it might be called belief – do you let others see the best version of you, or do they see a dull, low-intensity, passionless version of yourself?

Why do we find it difficult to sell ourselves?

I spent the first 3 years of my entrepreneurial career selling insurance over the telephone in the spanish language. I picked up the phone 20 times each day and worked through my script. 3 years of this taught me 2 things: the spanish language, and zero fear of a “No”.

I got to practice hundreds of times how I present myself.  I got pretty instant feedback whether my way of presenting myself engaged the other person into a conversation, or got a quick hang up on the telephone.  Time and time again I learnt that “Hello, I’m Conor” was not a great start (to somebody who doesn’t know Conor).

At an Entrepreneurs’ Organisation retreat last month, the facilitator asked everybody to introduce themselves following a specific structure:

  1. What I want you to know about me is _________
  2. What I expect from these days is _________
  3. My biggest dream for myself is ________
  4. My name is ________

It made such a difference to the standard introductions.  The standard version that I hear day after day is something along the lines of: “My name is John…  from London.  I’m glad to be here.  I work as a lawyer.  Ahh…  I guess that’s it…   Oh yeah…  I am married.  We have 2 kids.  Yeah, that’s all.”

By the time John has finished, he has managed to bore himself about his own life.  He certainly won’t be someone I’d think of asking questions about life, business or his hobbies.

On my online course, Speaking as a Leader, the first big lesson is about how to answer the question “Tell me about yourself?”.  (You can sign up for the free course here).  You will hear this question hundreds of times.  Instead of John’s response, what would be the 100% version of your potential version?

What’s your answer to “Tell me about yourself?”

Last week I taught a course on persuasive communication.  One individual was a charismatic speaker who repeatedly gave speeches that I would classify as “Rant”.  This is a passionate and initially engaging way of speaking, but it has no place in a Leader’s communication.

Screen Shot 2013-11-18 at 11.15.58

To rant is to speak or shout at length in an angry, impassioned way.

Leaders Do Not Rant

A rant is never a leadership speech.

A rant doesn’t help the situation.

A rant is lazy.

A rant is not enough.  You have to decide:

  1. “what action can I take to improve the situation?”
  2. “what action can we take together to improve the situation?”

If you are ranting about something that you can change, this is lazy: do the next step and take action, then ask us for action.

St Francis of Assisi had this prayer:

“Lord give me the strength to change the things I can change,
Give me the patience to accept the things I cannot change,
and the Wisdom to tell the difference.”

If you are ranting ab0ut something that we cannot change, you are wasting your energy.

The wisdom to tell the difference comes from thinking about whether there is an action that you or I can take that might improve the situation.  If I cannot find an action, then I am probably dealing with a type 2 Assisi situation: lets accept this one and find a place we can make a difference.  If I can find an action, then the speech is about inspiring us to take this action.

We are what we choose to become.

More on the Wisdom to tell the difference:

Have you ever harboured ambitions of a role in TV news broadcast?  Learn the ropes in 2 minutes with Charlie Brooker.

Structure Always Matters

This video is a joke (yes).  However, anyone who has attended my communication courses has learnt the importance of good speech structure.  It allows your message to reach the audience in a form that they can digest.  This news broadcast structure works – partly because it is what the news programs have taught us to expect – but doesn’t matter.   Don’t re-invent the wheel.

More about the BBC programme Newswipe: “Charlie Brooker’s How to Report the News – Newswipe – BBC Four”.